Deep archives: Lek in flux

The peacocks here are fickle.

Just when we think the good stuff is about to begin, we’ll have a day where all they want to do is sleep and eat. And it doesn’t seem to be based on the weather (at least not in any simple way), since the activity level has waxed and waned over the past week despite consistently warm clear days.

The one thing we’re sure of is this: we arrived here just on the cusp of the breeding season (more or less perfect timing, although possibly a little too early). We didn’t see any males display their trains our first day, but as time wore on we saw a few opportunistic male dances (despite a lack of female interest). About a week in, we started to hear a lot more calling by males in the morning, and we saw a few more displays and a little male-male aggression. It seemed as though males were starting to establish their territories. Each morning, we’d notice them spreading a little further away from the ideal habitat around the park entrance and cafe.

One morning this week we saw five males positioned strategically around the outskirts of a the big lawn to the north of the cafe, stationary but neither feeding nor resting (which certainly suggests territorial behaviour to me). The next day, a handful of new males had spread into the staff parking lot where we process captured birds. When we brought our first catch of the day back into the shady corner of the lot for processing, one of these new males started following us. A beggar, we initially thought, until he actually started trying to attack the bird Rob had in hand. Apparently the sight of male plumage is enough to provoke an attack even if it’s suspended above the ground under the arm of a giant! We’ve solved this problem by moving our sampling station and by having me chase away the odd interrupting bird (which sometimes ends in both of us running in circles).

Most recently, we are starting to see a few males in regular territories but we still can’t tell what is going on with the bulk of them. Our strategy is to put all of our efforts into catching until the middle of next week. Then, we’ll head to San Francisco for a couple of days off and hope that things will settle down by the time we get back!

Deep archives: Advanced moves

A follow-up to my previous post:

The other day, we were back at the Arboretum in the afternoon to catch birds during the second active time for peafowl (the birds like to get things done in the early morning and late afternoon, with an extended siesta between noon and 4pm). Within minutes of arriving, we’d caught our first male, but didn’t finish processing him until about 5 pm. Sunset was approaching and I didn’t think we’d have enough daylight to nab another. I headed to the bathroom to wash the peablood off of my hands and Rob went to check on our most recent capture, with the understanding that we’d meet back at the car in a few minutes and head home.

On my way back from the bathroom, Rob emerged from behind some shrubbery clutching yet another peacock, this one caught singlehandedly!

As we raced to process this bird before sunset, Rob rather excitedly explained how he’d accomplished his feat. First, he grabbed the bird’s legs from behind as we normally do. Then, he spent a few moments calling out for me, and when he realized I wasn’t coming he sat and puzzled over what he had to do next: singlehandedly get the bird into the reverse position where he would be able to use his body to secure its wings without letting it go.

While I’m still not too clear on the details, I can tell you this much: it involved kicking off his sandals and using his feet.